The Jewish roots of Christianity

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Bible teaching with an emphasis on Israel, prophecy and the Jewish roots of Christianity

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Episode: “The Family”
The first-century family was knit together by and depended on … olives! From picking to pressing to their use as lamp fuel, olives served as an integral part of Jewish family life. Zola presents the spiritual significance of oil, using the Lord’s parables.
Series: “The First Christians (2019)”
The Life and Times of Those Who First Believed in Jesus
Originally produced in 1995, The First Christians series explores the background of the customs and manners of Jesus’ day, unearthing the Jewish roots of Christianity. God chose this one people to speak to all humanity for all time. This nine program series seeks to better understand the people with whom He chose to reside on earth. From the studio, David and Kirsten Hart talk with Dr. Jeffrey Seif about the importance and modern applications for each program.

Caption transcript for The First Christians (2019): “The Family” (4/9)

  • 00:01 Jeffrey Seif: Dr. James Dobson spent a lifetime focusing on the family. "Zola Levitt Presents" is
  • 00:10 gonna focus on the family today. We're gonna do it our way looking at family life
  • 00:13 in 1st-century Judea.
  • 00:16 ♪♪♪
  • 00:21 male announcer: "Brethren, my heart's desire and prayer to God
  • 00:24 for Israel is that they might be saved.
  • 00:28 For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek:
  • 00:30 for the same Lord over all is rich unto all
  • 00:33 that call upon him."
  • 00:36 "Zola Levitt Presents."
  • 00:39 ♪♪♪
  • 00:49 CC BY ABERDEEN CAPTIONING 1-800-688-6621 WWW.ABERCAP.COM
  • 00:54 David Hart: Thank you for joining us today
  • 00:55 on "Zola Levitt Presents," I'm David Hart.
  • 00:57 Kirsten Hart: I'm Kirsten Hart.
  • 00:58 Jeffrey: I'm Jeffrey Seif,
  • 01:00 and I say let's take a look at family today.
  • 01:04 Kirsten: We love family, we have a family,
  • 01:07 but it's kind of interesting.
  • 01:08 Today you're gonna learn that Israeli life in 1st century
  • 01:12 revolved around a little, tiny olive.
  • 01:15 How important that olive was.
  • 01:17 Jeffrey: But what's interesting, you know,
  • 01:18 families live on industry, what's produced,
  • 01:20 and the olive wasn't just an industry.
  • 01:22 It was that there.
  • 01:23 People hear of the Mount of Olives,
  • 01:25 but it lights up the house.
  • 01:26 Love lights up the house, too, and I hope this program lights
  • 01:30 up the homes of those that view it.
  • 01:32 David: That's right.
  • 01:33 Right now let's go to Israeli archeologist Bob Mullins
  • 01:36 to find out more about the olive.
  • 01:40 Bob Mullins: The olive tree is mentioned
  • 01:41 in the Bible some 50 times.
  • 01:43 One of the first references to the olive is in the book of
  • 01:47 Genesis, where following Noah's flood we have a dove
  • 01:50 that returns to the ark with an olive branch in its mouth.
  • 01:55 Since that time the olive tree has been a symbol of peace
  • 01:58 and prosperity.
  • 02:01 One of the most noticeable things about the olive tree is
  • 02:04 the character of its leaves.
  • 02:06 You'll notice that the olive leaf has both a dark side
  • 02:11 and a lighter silvery underside, and the rabbis of Jesus's day
  • 02:16 made this connection between the effect of light by the movement
  • 02:21 of the leaves with the wind and one of the most important
  • 02:25 products of the olive tree, and that is the fruit of the olive
  • 02:28 tree, whose oil would be used for oil lamps.
  • 02:33 And so, we have light in connection with the tree itself
  • 02:36 and light in connection with the olive oil.
  • 02:40 The olive tree blossoms between March and April,
  • 02:43 and in fact, this is between the time of Passover and the time
  • 02:47 of Pentecost 50 days later.
  • 02:51 By July the fruit is fully formed on the tree,
  • 02:54 but it is still unripe.
  • 02:56 Now, the method that's used today is the same method
  • 02:57 that was used 2,000 years ago.
  • 03:03 What they did is they laid at the base of the tree a cloth
  • 03:07 that would catch the fruit as it came down from the tree.
  • 03:11 The method of gathering the fruit was different
  • 03:14 in various ways.
  • 03:16 For example, it was possible to climb up into the tree
  • 03:18 and pick the fruit by hand.
  • 03:21 One could also up in the tree shake the branches, and this
  • 03:24 would release some of the fruit, and it was also possible on the
  • 03:28 ground with long sticks to reach up and hit the tree
  • 03:31 and also knock down the fruit, as well.
  • 03:35 ♪♪♪
  • 03:45 ♪♪♪
  • 03:51 Bob: After the harvesting the olives would be collected and
  • 03:54 taken down to the crushing installation and at that point
  • 03:58 the olives would be placed into a stone basin,
  • 04:02 all 20 to 40 pounds and even more of the olives
  • 04:05 that had been gathered from the various trees,
  • 04:08 and in the basin you have a stone wheel that stands.
  • 04:12 Attached to this wheel is a wooden beam and either by people
  • 04:16 pushing this stone wheel around on the olives or a donkey
  • 04:20 pulling the wheel, the wheel would rotate on top of the
  • 04:22 olives and completely crush the olive fruit into a mash.
  • 04:27 Now, during this crushing process there would, of course,
  • 04:30 be olive oil that was released.
  • 04:32 This initial olive oil was used for special purposes, and we
  • 04:36 know from the Bible as well as other ancient literature that
  • 04:39 olive oil had both secular as well as sacred purposes,
  • 04:44 and especially for religious purposes this initial olive oil
  • 04:47 would be collected and used in the anointing of priests
  • 04:50 and kings, prophets.
  • 04:54 These baskets are filled with the mash and then brought
  • 04:58 over to the beam press, which is the second stage
  • 05:02 of the olive production.
  • 05:07 Now, there are several of these baskets that are placed one
  • 05:11 above the other on top of this stone table that you see here
  • 05:15 and across the top of these baskets is laid a piece of wood
  • 05:18 that would provide evenness to the squeezing that would
  • 05:21 take place underneath this wooden beam.
  • 05:26 ♪♪♪
  • 05:35 Bob: Now, the weighting is done by stones.
  • 05:38 Each stone is quite heavy.
  • 05:40 It would take between two to four men to lift a stone like
  • 05:43 this, where ropes would be attached and laid
  • 05:46 at this end of the beam.
  • 05:48 With every stone that's attached more weight is gonna be given to
  • 05:52 squeeze down on these baskets and get out all the olive oil
  • 05:56 possible, which then flows into the channel and down a chute
  • 06:02 such as you see here into the basin.
  • 06:06 The olive oil collected in the basin here could be used for
  • 06:08 a variety of purposes, amongst them cooking, for cosmetics,
  • 06:13 and also as fuel for lighting oil lamps.
  • 06:16 Let's go now and have a look at a 1st-century home
  • 06:18 and see how olive oil was used.
  • 06:22 ♪♪♪
  • 06:30 Bob: From the olive oil which has just been pressed outside,
  • 06:34 it would have been brought into the home and stored
  • 06:36 in large pottery jars.
  • 06:39 From that large jar the lady of the home would gather the oil
  • 06:43 into a smaller pottery container and go around the home filling
  • 06:47 up the various oil lamps which had been placed
  • 06:49 in various window sills and niches around the home.
  • 06:54 The oil would be poured through the small round opening
  • 06:57 on the top of the oil lamp.
  • 06:59 There would have been a wick in the nozzle of the lamp made
  • 07:02 of flax, which is a plant fiber, which would have then been lit
  • 07:06 giving light to various parts of the home.
  • 07:09 Jesus himself made reference to oil lamps.
  • 07:12 One context he speaks of taking an oil lamp and placing it
  • 07:15 onto a lampstand, which would have been a practice
  • 07:17 in the 1st century.
  • 07:23 Zola Levitt: And as the day came to a close in
  • 07:24 the 1st century, the family rested by the flickering light
  • 07:28 of little clay lamps fueled from the fruit of the olive tree.
  • 07:32 ♪♪♪
  • 07:39 Zola: Well, when we come into the 1st-century
  • 07:41 Israeli home, as Bob was telling us, oil was just everything.
  • 07:46 It was used for light, for healing,
  • 07:49 for religious purposes, for cooking.
  • 07:53 Very important to their lives.
  • 07:56 As to the religious purposes, you know, the whole miracle
  • 07:59 of Hanukkah, which is celebrated every year in December,
  • 08:02 is about oil.
  • 08:04 When the Maccabees overran the temple and rebelled against
  • 08:10 the Antiochus Epiphanes who was ruling Jerusalem
  • 08:12 at the time in 165 B.C. everything was fine,
  • 08:17 except they discovered there was only one small can of oil
  • 08:23 for the grand menorah in the--
  • 08:26 the candlestick in the holy place in the temple.
  • 08:31 That was awful because it--
  • 08:33 the oil had to be carefully consecrated,
  • 08:36 and we're gonna talk about that.
  • 08:37 It was very special for that candlestick, and it would take
  • 08:41 a week to do that, but they lit the one day's oil
  • 08:44 and they prayed and as the week went on the light remained
  • 08:47 and remained and remained and now to this day every synagogue
  • 08:51 has an eternal light.
  • 08:53 It never is off day and night, every day of the year,
  • 08:56 on and on, and it burned eight days.
  • 08:59 And so, the Jews light a candle, another candle every night
  • 09:02 for eight nights at Hanukkah to celebrate that miracle.
  • 09:07 To the Christian, oil is the Holy Spirit in the Scripture
  • 09:10 from start to finish and a very, very important symbol.
  • 09:14 The Christian is indwelt and the concept is given
  • 09:18 in 2 Corinthians 4.
  • 09:21 "For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness,
  • 09:24 hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge
  • 09:27 of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.
  • 09:30 But we have this treasure in earthen vessels,
  • 09:34 that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us."
  • 09:37 These are earthen vessels.
  • 09:39 This is a picture of a Christian, an oil lamp.
  • 09:42 With this lamp I can light another and another
  • 09:43 and another and the first one is not diminished
  • 09:46 and all I have to do is continually replenish the oil.
  • 09:49 In other words, taking the Holy Spirit as I walk
  • 09:52 and the flame burns brightly and can ignite others.
  • 09:56 That is a prime symbol, and the Lord used it with Revelation 2:3
  • 10:01 in talking to the seven churches of Asia.
  • 10:04 When he found error he would say,
  • 10:06 "I'll remove your candlestick if you don't correct it."
  • 10:09 Of course, the candlestick is another form of an oil lamp.
  • 10:12 You fill the base with oil and with wicks and the light
  • 10:15 is brought up the branches, so the Lord was gonna
  • 10:17 remove the candlestick altogether.
  • 10:20 The candlestick was the sign that the church was alive,
  • 10:24 that it was lit, that the light was there.
  • 10:26 The Lord himself, of course, called the light of the world.
  • 10:29 In the tabernacle there was a strict prohibition
  • 10:33 against creating oil that was not authentic.
  • 10:37 Everything in the tabernacle had to be simply perfect:
  • 10:40 the incense, the perfumes, the various things.
  • 10:44 And when I say the tabernacle, of course, I refer to the--
  • 10:47 back in the Exodus the tent that God told them to make.
  • 10:50 The instructions run from Exodus 25 on for many chapters and
  • 10:55 concerning the materials within the thing and especially
  • 11:02 the oils, the incense, and so on.
  • 11:04 He gave--actually gave the chemistry that was supposed
  • 11:06 to be used and, frankly, it was quite expensive.
  • 11:09 They had gathered treasure of the Egyptians when they left,
  • 11:12 and they had these things, but there would probably be
  • 11:15 a temptation not to use the finest things and to withhold
  • 11:18 some things for themselves, so it says this in Exodus 31:34,
  • 11:24 or Exodus 30:34, "And the Lord said unto Moses,
  • 11:27 Take unto thee sweet spices, stacte, and onycha,
  • 11:31 and galbanum," I don't know these things,
  • 11:34 "these sweet spices with pure frankincense:
  • 11:37 of each shall there be a like weight."
  • 11:39 It's a recipe.
  • 11:41 "And thou shalt make it a perfume, a confection after the
  • 11:45 art of the apothecary, tempered together, pure and holy."
  • 11:49 The idea of all this perfection and expensive materials
  • 11:52 and exact recipes is that: pure and holy.
  • 11:56 And so it was with the lamps, the--and the altar of incense
  • 12:02 and so on and, finally, he wraps it all up
  • 12:04 at the end of the chapter with a single verse.
  • 12:06 It's quite striking.
  • 12:08 "Whosoever shall make like unto that, to smell thereto--"
  • 12:12 In other words, a synthetic version.
  • 12:14 May make one with cheaper ingredients that smells the same
  • 12:18 and acts the same and maybe burns the same.
  • 12:21 "Whosoever shall make like unto that, to smell thereto,
  • 12:24 shall even be cut off from among his people."
  • 12:27 An interesting explanation of God's concern over the synthesis
  • 12:33 of these materials for the tabernacle as given in the
  • 12:36 Scofield Bible, where he likens the synthetic product to
  • 12:41 bringing in false worship from outside in the community,
  • 12:46 like a church that, say, hires professional musicians
  • 12:50 to come in and play for the service.
  • 12:52 The musicians are better.
  • 12:53 They're probably finer than the musicians that happen
  • 12:57 and people that play instruments and go to the church.
  • 12:59 Obviously, if you get the city symphony orchestra and the opera
  • 13:02 choir to do Handel's "Messiah" and you do this in your church,
  • 13:06 it's going to be a magnificent performance,
  • 13:09 and people have done that.
  • 13:10 It was done in Handel's time, but it usually was done, by the
  • 13:13 way, in Handel and Bach's time, by the people of the church
  • 13:16 who were the competent musicians.
  • 13:18 Nowadays that's not true and some churches hire musicians.
  • 13:22 Well, when you bring them in, they're like that synthetic oil.
  • 13:24 They smell like it too.
  • 13:27 That is, they play the right notes for sure and they sing
  • 13:29 the right notes, but condemns the idea that they are not
  • 13:33 really part of the worship prescribed of the Lord.
  • 13:36 The composer Handel, or Bach, they were Christian people
  • 13:40 who saw the face of God, in Handel's words, or with Bach's
  • 13:44 music he said, "This for the greater glory of God,"
  • 13:47 on the front page constantly.
  • 13:49 They were believers, but bringing in synthetic
  • 13:51 musicians--and this happened in my own life because before
  • 13:54 I came to the Lord I was a professional musician,
  • 13:56 and I was an oboe player, and I would get once in a while
  • 13:59 what was called an Easter gig or a Christmas gig,
  • 14:01 a job to play in a church, though I was
  • 14:05 an unbeliever entirely, a purely unsaved
  • 14:07 Jewish, and I would play for money.
  • 14:09 I would play well.
  • 14:11 I would thrill to the fine music, but I had no idea what
  • 14:14 these people believed and couldn't care less, so that,
  • 14:19 I think, is what is explained here.
  • 14:21 Now, as we look on further with the oil we'll see that it is
  • 14:24 crucial to marriage and family life among the first Christians.
  • 14:30 ♪♪♪
  • 14:40 ♪♪♪
  • 14:49 announcer: Our resource this week the music CD, "Zion Song."
  • 14:53 During his lifetime, Zola Levitt composed
  • 14:56 over 200 Spirit-filled songs.
  • 14:59 Now David and Kirsten Hart, studio hosts
  • 15:01 of "Zola Levitt Presents," provide fresh interpretations
  • 15:05 to 11 of Zola's compositions.
  • 15:08 Enjoy this beautiful music yourself or share of the CD
  • 15:12 with a friend.
  • 15:13 Contact us and ask for "Zion Song."
  • 15:19 ♪♪♪
  • 15:29 ♪ Sha'alu shalom Yerushalayim. ♪
  • 15:32 ♪ Sha'alu, sha'alu shalom. ♪
  • 15:37 ♪ For the holy city of Jerusalem ♪
  • 15:44 ♪ we will pray for peace. ♪
  • 15:47 ♪ Sha'alu shalom. ♪
  • 15:55 ♪ Shalom. ♪
  • 15:58 Kirsten: We have been talking about family life.
  • 16:00 We love our family, and I just want to encourage you a great
  • 16:03 thing for you to do as a family is go to Israel.
  • 16:09 We go two times a year. We have wonderful trips.
  • 16:12 You get to learn about the Holy Land and Yeshua.
  • 16:15 Come with us.
  • 16:17 Now let's go back to Israel to hear more from Zola.
  • 16:23 Zola: With marriage oil was all important, too,
  • 16:27 because the bride had to trim an oil lamp every night.
  • 16:31 I think you know the story.
  • 16:33 If you watch our program we've told it in many forms,
  • 16:35 but, well, the bridegroom would propose one night
  • 16:38 with a cup of wine.
  • 16:39 If she would drink it, he'd say, "I go to prepare a place for
  • 16:41 you," and go back to his father's house where he'd build
  • 16:44 a little mansion for them, a bridal chamber
  • 16:47 for the honeymoon.
  • 16:48 And immediately that night she would trim an oil lamp and put
  • 16:51 that by her bed and that was because the bridegrooms liked
  • 16:55 to come at midnight.
  • 16:57 They'd come with a shout, as the Lord himself will descend from
  • 16:59 heaven with a shout, and take her away, so she had to have
  • 17:03 a lamp in her hand because of the rough terrain and there were
  • 17:06 no street lamps and there was rocky,
  • 17:09 hilly territory in ancient Israel.
  • 17:11 And so, that oil lamp became the sign that she was waiting and
  • 17:15 the fact that she had oil in hand to trim it, the fact that
  • 17:20 she knew he could come for her at any moment.
  • 17:23 And in Matthew 25, of course, we read the parable
  • 17:25 of the ten virgins.
  • 17:27 Five had oil in their lamps, five did not, and the--
  • 17:30 it was midnight and a cry was made,
  • 17:32 "Behold, the bridegroom cometh.
  • 17:34 Go ye out to meet him."
  • 17:36 Well, the five without oil couldn't do that.
  • 17:39 It says they went out to buy some oil.
  • 17:42 Now, they knew what they needed.
  • 17:44 They knew who the bridegroom was.
  • 17:46 They weren't surprised by his-- by the cry that was made.
  • 17:50 They wanted to get married. They were virgins.
  • 17:52 Virgins wanna get married. What was the problem?
  • 17:55 They just didn't think he was coming that night.
  • 17:58 We should never have a night when we think the Lord
  • 18:00 isn't coming tonight.
  • 18:02 He can come any night.
  • 18:04 I like to say, "He more likely will come tonight
  • 18:06 than last night.
  • 18:08 He didn't come last night."
  • 18:09 Surely having paid the price he did for this bride,
  • 18:12 he's certainly gonna come back for this church,
  • 18:14 for the Jews and Gentiles that believe in him.
  • 18:17 So, oil was important in that, too, and with family life in
  • 18:22 general, once this home is made and once the oil is brought in
  • 18:27 and it's lit and it's heated and it's functioning,
  • 18:32 the home was the center of everyone's life.
  • 18:36 Now, that may seem like an obvious statement,
  • 18:39 but we are maybe in a generation where the home is just
  • 18:42 a place where, as one comedian put it,
  • 18:45 you put your stuff while you go out and get more stuff.
  • 18:48 We do not center around the home the way they did.
  • 18:52 Schooling was done, of course, in the synagogue.
  • 18:54 That they had schools, but at home the idea was that
  • 18:57 the morality of Jewish life, the religion,
  • 19:01 the spiritual quality was taught to the children by the parents.
  • 19:04 Nobody depended on teachers, et cetera,
  • 19:07 to teach that as we're seeming to try to do in our society.
  • 19:11 Correction was done at home.
  • 19:14 The Bible is clear on disciplining children.
  • 19:16 Don't spare the rod, et cetera, and children were expected
  • 19:21 to learn from their parents how to live as proper members
  • 19:24 of the Jewish society.
  • 19:26 They still are, and people that give the Jews their due realize
  • 19:30 that in the Jewish community the children aren't wild.
  • 19:33 There is no need for special programs that rehabilitate them
  • 19:36 from bad habits or find them jobs or whatever.
  • 19:39 There never has been in any country any problem
  • 19:41 with the Jewish community in that respect.
  • 19:45 Worship was occasionally prescribed, that is,
  • 19:48 through the year.
  • 19:50 Passover is a home holiday to be conducted by the father of the
  • 19:52 family, to be prepared by the mother of the family,
  • 19:55 in which the children of the family have specific jobs.
  • 19:59 Mother would make a magnificent meal and set out her special
  • 20:02 Passover dishes.
  • 20:04 Father would don a tabernacle robe, the kittel,
  • 20:06 and he would conduct the service.
  • 20:08 The children would ask the four questions,
  • 20:11 go to the door to see if the prophet Elijah
  • 20:13 was coming to announce the coming of the Messiah.
  • 20:16 All these functions were family functions, and yet this is one
  • 20:22 of the grand high feasts.
  • 20:24 It wasn't done at the synagogue.
  • 20:25 In Jesus's time you took your lamp to the temple,
  • 20:28 and you offered it, and then you took it home
  • 20:30 and you had Passover that night.
  • 20:33 Today, you hold the thing at your house.
  • 20:36 The synagogue may have a Passover in general for singles
  • 20:39 or people out of town, et cetera,
  • 20:41 but Passover was a family holiday at home.
  • 20:45 Hanukkah is much the same.
  • 20:47 There are services at the synagogue, of course,
  • 20:49 in these seasons, but at home is where the religious worship is.
  • 20:53 You might think of it like Christmas is a home holiday
  • 20:58 and the Easter is a church holiday,
  • 21:00 so they had the same concept.
  • 21:03 The spiritual and worldly inheritance came from this home
  • 21:07 life, this home worship and, you know, when the gospel came
  • 21:11 to the Jews in the 1st century it was very often brought
  • 21:14 right into the home.
  • 21:16 Think of Zacchaeus the tax collector in Jericho.
  • 21:18 Jesus went to his home to sup with him.
  • 21:21 Lydia's house was used.
  • 21:23 The jailer who took Paul in Philippi, and we examined
  • 21:27 his jail on one of our tours.
  • 21:29 It's still there, and Paul said to him, "Believe on the Lord
  • 21:34 Jesus," Acts 16:31, "and thou shalt be saved,
  • 21:38 thy and thine house."
  • 21:40 The whole household would be saved, and so it was.
  • 21:43 In Cornelius's house.
  • 21:45 Most important to Gentile salvation.
  • 21:47 In Acts 10, when Peter came to the house of Cornelius,
  • 21:49 there were his friends, his wife, their wives,
  • 21:51 Roman officers, and he still held forth and said,
  • 21:54 "Of a truth I perceive God is no respecter of persons."
  • 21:57 The Lord had taken him to Caesarea to begin the mission
  • 22:01 to the Gentiles and there Gentiles were saved.
  • 22:07 It seems that the two become, Jews and Gentiles,
  • 22:10 one in a household to God and those very terms are used
  • 22:15 in one of the most elegant passages in Scripture
  • 22:18 that explain this.
  • 22:19 Ephesians 2.
  • 22:21 "Wherefore remember," I read from verse 11,
  • 22:24 "that ye being in times past Gentiles in the flesh,
  • 22:27 who are called Uncircumcision by that which is called
  • 22:30 the Circumcision in the flesh made by hands;
  • 22:32 that at that time ye were without Christ,"
  • 22:35 he's talking to the Gentiles, "being aliens from
  • 22:37 the commonwealth of Israel, and strangers from the covenants
  • 22:41 of promise, having no hope, and without God in the world."
  • 22:44 Then he gets on in the passage.
  • 22:46 Tells about how Christ is brought to the Gentiles and then
  • 22:49 in verse 19, "Now therefore ye are no more strangers
  • 22:53 and foreigners, but fellowcitizens with the saints,
  • 22:56 and of the household of God; and are built upon
  • 22:59 the foundation of the apostles and prophets,
  • 23:01 Jesus Christ himself being the chief corner stone;
  • 23:05 in whom all the building fitly framed together groweth
  • 23:07 unto a holy temple in the Lord."
  • 23:10 So, that is how the household ultimately becomes even
  • 23:15 the building of the Lord, the Spirit, and the church.
  • 23:20 ♪♪♪
  • 23:27 [singing in Hebrew]
  • 25:30 Kirsten: That was the music of Zipporah Bennett
  • 25:32 and her group.
  • 25:34 We're so thankful that they were with us in 1995.
  • 25:36 Check her out. She's still singing today.
  • 25:39 Family. It's all about family today.
  • 25:41 Jeffrey: Yeah, I feel for those that have trouble
  • 25:43 in the family.
  • 25:44 You know, I tell my wife, Barry, that home is wherever she is,
  • 25:49 and people live alone today, and even people live together
  • 25:52 with people and there is pain.
  • 25:54 Recovering a biblical approach to family
  • 25:56 is so, so, so important.
  • 25:59 David: We love social media, and our kids are on it
  • 26:01 all the time.
  • 26:03 Back in the day they didn't have all that, so I think family
  • 26:06 might have been a little tighter back in the day, you think?
  • 26:08 Jeffrey: Well, there's a lot of distractions, you know?
  • 26:10 I don't think social media meets the needs.
  • 26:13 People talk about connecting.
  • 26:15 There is still a lot of disconnection,
  • 26:17 and back in the day they're not distracted by television.
  • 26:20 Sorry.
  • 26:21 Yeah, I know, you know, but a lotta times people just zone
  • 26:24 out, and they don't do things together,
  • 26:27 and it's important to recover that.
  • 26:29 It used to be back in the day people would gather together
  • 26:31 around a family Bible and pray together.
  • 26:33 My wife and I do that in the morning.
  • 26:35 Simple things there are that people can do
  • 26:38 to strengthen a family.
  • 26:40 Thank you for strengthening our family.
  • 26:42 That is to say "Zola Levitt Presents"
  • 26:44 is a ministry, and it's all hands on deck
  • 26:48 helping to move forward, and it's your contributions
  • 26:50 to this family that help us feed the kids.
  • 26:53 There is a world out there that needs to know the Lord and that
  • 26:57 needs biblical medicine for life's assorted hurts,
  • 27:00 and we think the Great Physician delivers through
  • 27:03 "Zola Levitt Presents."
  • 27:05 David: I gotta say I'm looking forward to next week.
  • 27:07 It's all about agriculture in the 1st century.
  • 27:10 We'd love for you to join us for that.
  • 27:12 Jeffrey: Do it, please.
  • 27:13 And as you go now, sha'alu shalom Yerushalayim.
  • 27:17 Kirsten: Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.
  • 27:21 male announcer: Our monthly newsletter, "The Levitt Letter,"
  • 27:23 is free and full of insightful articles and news commentary
  • 27:27 from a messianic perspective.
  • 27:29 Visit levitt.com to find our newsletter,
  • 27:32 along with current and past programs,
  • 27:34 our television schedule, and much more.
  • 27:37 female announcer: Don't forget to order this week's
  • 27:39 resource by calling 1-800-WONDERS,
  • 27:43 or you can purchase it from our store at levitt.com.
  • 27:47 male announcer: Your donations to Zola Levitt Ministries
  • 27:49 help these organizations bless Israel.
  • 27:52 female announcer: Thanks again for joining us this week.
  • 27:55 Zola Levitt Ministries and this television program depend
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  • 28:25 male announcer: This has been a paid program brought to you
  • 28:27 by Zola Levitt Ministries.

Episodes in this series

  1. Birth
  2. The Home
  3. Livelihood
  4. The Family
  5. Agriculture
  6. Government
  7. Religion
  8. Messiah
  9. Death

Guest organizations and links

Zola Levitt Presents
Levitt Letter
Tours
Podcasts